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Review: “Granite State,” Breaking Bad season 5, episode 15

September 22nd, 2013 | Posted by Philip J Reed in review | television

Granite State, Breaking Bad

While not officially referred to as one, “Granite State” is the first half of a two-part series finale. It has to be, because as a stand-alone episode it doesn’t really accomplish much.

That’s not to say that nothing happens, but it is to draw the distinction between “movement” and “accomplishment.” “Granite State” consists almost entirely of the former, and that’s okay. It may well mean that the latter comes next week. There sure is a heck of a lot left to resolve, though, and that’s what worries me.

Speaking of movement, I’m already ahead of myself, so I’ll double back a bit.

The reason I say this episode doesn’t work quite as well as a standalone is that we’re in a new place. Or, rather, a hell of a lot of new places. Walt’s new identity, Marie’s life without Hank, Junior’s knowledge of his father’s doings, Skyler’s dealings with the police and the Nazis, Jesse’s slavery…everything’s new. This is certainly the Breaking Bad we’ve been following for five seasons, but it’s also, pretty clearly, a new situation, emblemized not only by the fact that Walt obtained a new identity at the end of “Ozymandias,” but by the fact that Saul is quite literally cycled out of Walter’s life now in favor of a new character in a similar — but not identical — role.

This isn’t Mr. White visiting his lawyer for advice…this is Mr. Lambert being visited by his deleter* for basic sustenance.

It’s a different show. Or I guess I should say a different story. Which makes “Granite State,” for all it does right, feel unflatteringly like “Blood Money” to me. A lot of setup, a lot of maneuvering. Some great moments. Some indelible images. But it exists not for its own sake…it exists for the sake of getting all the pawns into the right place for the start of next week’s episode.

It also doesn’t really help that so much is left unresolved at this point. We have about 45 minutes left of the grand story to tell, but it doesn’t feel like we’re any closer to the end than we were a few weeks back. Hank’s story, of course, is over, so I guess we’re mathematically closer to having the loose ends tied up, but that’s it.

The simple rock-and-a-hard-place situation Skyler suddenly finds herself in could have been good for a season-long arc. Now whatever happens will happen fast, and that’ll be the end of it. Walt Jr. processing his emotions** should structurally come at about this point, but it’s fending for screen time with everything else that’s going on, so you get him called to the principal’s office and that’ll have to do. The break-in at Marie’s house is conveyed by a speeding vehicle and a shot of the destruction. Even Saul’s departure gets one (admittedly great) single scene, and the logistics behind deleting his identity are glossed over simply because we’re almost finished here so, please, everyone, let’s hurry up.***

I want to like “Granite State” a lot more than I do. Maybe it would have done them better to open with Walt a month or so into his exile, because following the process just makes it apparent how many holes there are. Jump ahead in time and we’ll assume things, because we have to. Allow us to watch you at work, though, and we’ll know when there are pieces missing.

This is all — do I really even need to say this? — without having seen “Felina.” I could eat my words, and I look forward to doing so. Maybe viewed through the lens of the final episode, “Granite State” will reveal itself as a work of brilliance. At the very least, I’m sure it’ll work better simply because we’ll have a stronger sense of what the place-setting was in aid of. For now, though? It feels less like Breaking Bad and more like a series of skits about these characters, arranged like an FAQ.

If the Nazis know about the tape in Hank’s house, won’t they go and get it?
Yes. They will go and get it.

Even though Walt tried to distance Skyler from his crimes with last week’s phone call, won’t the police still try to get to him through her?
Yes. The police are trying to get to him through her.

Is Jesse still in the cage?
Good question. Yes, Jesse is still in the cage.

How is Walt Jr. handling all of this?
Here is a scene to show you how he’s handling all of this.

It just seemed a bit…rigid. And for a storyline that’s so obviously in flux, that’s bizarre and disappointing.

Don’t get me wrong…a lot of what it did worked, but it failed to cohere. Walt’s last ditch effort to rope Saul into his revenge, the snowy isolation of New Hampshire, the conversation with his son, the IV dangling from a deer antler…this is all great stuff. The ingredients are there, and they’re all mixed together, but nobody turned on the stove. And it culminates in what is probably the clumsiest bit of expository desperation Breaking Bad has ever resorted to: The Charlie Rose Show.

I like Charlie Rose. Awesome guy. It’s nice to see him here. And it’s nice to see him interviewing two characters from the early years of the show. I fault none of them…but I do fault the writing, which had Jessica Hecht (last seen in my single favorite episode) discussing the Heisenberg character as though she’s reading from somebody’s half-baked but well-intentioned YouTube comment on a “WALT IS A BADASS!!!!” compilation video.

End in the middle of a shootout, and I’ll trust you to make good on it. End on one character metatextualizing another and I’m not going to be quite as confident. That was sloppy.

I did like a few of the misleads in this episode — from thinking Uncle Jack was angry that Todd never told him about the boy all the way through making it seem like Louis was going to be a character that served an actual purpose — but for all the shuffling and shifting around, I’m left a bit cold.

There are some nice thematic callbacks to the grander scheme of things, reminding us that as detached as “Granite State” feels it’s still part of the same show. Such as Skyler phasing in and out during her discussion with the DEA, and Andrea joining the likes of Hugo, Gale, Gomez, Ted, and Jane’s dad on the list of good people steamrolled by the momentum of Somebody Else’s Evil.

I also liked how Jesse’s escape toyed with us. We’ve seen him gradually become more and more valuable and intelligent as an ally, to the point that he was outthinking both Walt and Mike earlier this season. The magnets…the train robbery…the conviction that Lydia didn’t betray them. Those were all Jesse. He was the cooler, leveler head…and he prevailed.

Granted, it doesn’t take much in the way of intelligence to stack up a bunch of crap and hope it reaches the top, but that’s okay. Because we want to read all of these things together. We want to see Jesse get out of the pit, and we want it to feel earned. We can read these things as foreshadowing so that it does…all we need is for Jesse to make it.

And, for a little while, it seems like he might. But there’s a fence. And he’s dragged right back down.

Which is a bit what it felt like to watch “Granite State.” For a little while, it feels like it just might climb out of the hole it’s dug. But it doesn’t, and we end on an even lower point. It’s up to “Felina” to get us out.

I am confident that it will. Just don’t ask me how, or why it needed a lead-in so uncharacteristically graceless in order to do it.

—–
* Did anyone feel like it was just a bit of a stretch that this happened, by the way? I always got the sense that this character would take your money, furnish you with some new docs, and disavow all knowledge forever. If you fucked up after that, oh well; it’s in his best interest to leave no connections, for just such an occasion. He did make a few comments to the effect that Walt was a special case, but I couldn’t really buy that as an explanation. He’s a special case, yes, but he’s special in the way that you’d want to get him out of your life even more quickly, and you certainly wouldn’t want to be establishing lasting links with the man.

** It sure was nice to see some “forgotten” characters back again though, I have to admit. Carmen, Gretchen and Elliott were welcome faces, even if they were wedged into an already overstuffed episode.

*** Seriously? I know the idea is to show that this deleter guy is Mike-like in his ability to GSD — or get shit done, as they say — but Goodman’s a regional celebrity with a mountain of active clients and active employees on his payroll. Not to mention shifty business associates that relied on him and aren’t going to be happy that he skipped town. And everyone’s somehow supposed to forget about him in a couple of days? Nebraska’s not the moon, and the kinds of people Goodman deals with are the kinds of people who would be perfectly happy to make the trip. These are steps that the show used to relish exploring, but now it feels like we’re just skipping things.

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27 Responses

  • Philip J Reed says:

    I could edit to add this, but what they hey, I’ll stick it in a comment since it slipped my mind:

    There was an Amber Alert warning that interrupted my broadcast. It happened right after Skyler picked up Holly from the crib, and carried through until part of the way through Todd and Lydia’s back to back conversation. I may have missed something important there. I won’t know until tomorrow when iTunes lets me download it, but there you go. If that 40 seconds or so managed to tie everything together, I stand corrected.

    • Jory says:

      I’m inclined to say “Nahhhhh”, but maybe append a question mark to the end of it?

      Lydia thinks Todd should have killed Skyler, Todd says Skyler staying alive is an acceptable risk. It’s possible Todd’s high regard for Walter and his family will play some role in the finale, though, I guess.

      I agree completely with your review: I think the biggest issue was that the episode didn’t feel very grounded (added to how straight-up clumsy it was at times.) That unfortunately extends to some ongoing frustration of mine that we’re spending so much time in the final episodes dealing with Todd and the neo-Nazis. They’re perfectly strong characters, but they feel like kind of a shoehorned-in Big Bad that I don’t think the series really needed, since it already had, y’know, Walt.

      Still a really good episode, though, and I’m fairly confident “Felina” will swoop in and save it.

      • Philip J Reed says:

        Ahh thank you. I guess I only missed some dialogue then…by the time we cut back to the show they were already discussing why Skyler gets to live.

        Thanks, as ever, for reading!

  • Sachin says:

    I find your article strictly based upon your personal views … So I would not delve into that at all … I find it is stupid and urge you to keep your thoughts in your mind rather than posting it online ……..

    But I would like to point out a flaw in your article which forced me to come into this comment box and type … You acted in the article as if you cared about the smallest of the details but in the process you proved what a dick you are…………
    When you typed
    “I did like a few of the misleads in this episode — from thinking Uncle Jack was angry that Todd never told him about the boy all the way through making it seem like Louis was going to be a character that served an actual purpose — but for all the shuffling and shifting around, I’m left a bit cold.”

    Well…….. that was not a mislead at all you dumb fuck ….. Only you could have thought that was a mislead as a few episodes earlier when Todd was having coffee with Uncle Jack he had recounted the same story to his Uncle and his friend ……. But you were too dumb to notice that …… FUCKING IDIOT

    • Theo says:

      Jesus Sachin, why are you so butthurt, chill the F down. I Agree with every single word in this review, i think Philip did an excellent job in reviewing this as I and many others i know felt the exact same way about these scenes and overall the episode. I Really hope Felina will be a HUGE episode, but at the moment i just think the series should have ended with Ozymandias to be honest, Im still seeing that ep as the Breaking Bad finale if you know what I mean. Im well looking forward to be proved wrong by next weeks episode tho.

    • krizle says:

      chill out man whats with the hostility? what YOU didn’t notice is that todd didn’t mention shooting the boy when he was telling his uncle and cousin about the train heist…geez some people…no need for the cursing take a chill pill shove it up ur ass maybe?

      • Philip J Reed says:

        Yeah, I didn’t think I needed to add “…because the last time Uncle Jack heard about this story, Todd artfully neglected to mention that he killed a little boy.” But I guess I do, so…

        …the last time Uncle Jack heard about this story, Todd artfully neglected to mention that he killed a little boy.

        Thanks for reading, Sachin!

    • Philip J Reed says:

      “I find your article strictly based upon your personal views …” That’s correct; this is a review.

    • Halibut says:

      I actually agree with Sachin.

      You need to explain way more things with your reviews, you hack.

      For example, I have selected (AND CORRECTED) a random paragraph from this very review. The necessary additions are in brackets.

      “There are some nice thematic callbacks to the grander scheme of things, reminding us that as detached as “Granite State” (The title of this episode) feels it’s still part of the same show. Such as Skyler (Walter White’s wife) phasing in and out during her discussion with the DEA (Drug Envestigation Agency), and Andrea (Brock’s mother and Brock is Walt’s enemy) joining the likes of Hugo (he is the janitor who smoked weed), Gale (he was a meth cook), Gomez (Hank’s dead partner who was Mexican), Ted (Skyler fucked him), and Jane’s dad (he flew planes on a computer screen) on the list of good people steamrolled by the momentum of Somebody Else’s Evil (Walt) (Heisenberg) (Walt is Evil).

      In the future, take a bit more care when posting your personal opinions to the internet.

  • E[X] says:

    > but it doesn’t feel like we’re any closer to the end than we were a few weeks back

    I don’t feel this way. The show was about a chemistry teacher cooking meth, he got caught, Hank died, but now the secret’s out, everyone knows, he’s wanted by the DEA. The premise of the show is over.

    There is an aftermath to deal with, but there will always be an aftermath unless every character dies. The show could have ended with ozymandias.

    > I always got the sense that this character would take your money, furnish you with some new docs, and disavow all knowledge forever.

    He’s doing it for the 10 million dollars. I think the point was made pretty clearly.

    > Seriously? I know the idea is to show that this deleter guy is Mike-like in his ability to GSD — or get shit done, as they say — but Goodman’s a regional celebrity with a mountain of active clients and active employees on his payroll.

    Who says he won’t get caught?

    • Philip J Reed says:

      Believe me, my concern isn’t that there’s aftermath to deal with. It’s the opposite: that with so much aftermath to deal with, we’re skipping steps. Breaking Bad at its best RELISHES aftermath. It just left itself too much aftermath to deal with in too short a time.

      Also I wouldn’t say “the point was made pretty clearly” that the Deleter is doing it for the $10 mil. I’m not saying he isn’t, but I am saying that that still leaves us with questions. If he wanted the money, why not just charge Walter more up front? Why is he letting himself be talked into doing favors for more money if ultimately he’s just going to take the barell anyway? Why is he working so hard to keep Walter alive if the sooner the man dies the sooner he gets the cash? I think it’s far from a pretty clear point, but hey, maybe that’s just me.

      And I’m not saying Saul won’t get caught either. As I say above, we don’t know where any of this is going yet. I’m happy to admit that. What I take issue with is that the character says he can erase Saul from existence in a couple of days, and Saul himself believes this is doable. This is the sort of thing that needs a little more explanation, I think. Again, we’re skipping steps, and it looks like that’s because the show left too much to deal with until the end…not because it’s the best way to tell the story. It feels sloppy.

      • E[X] says:

        > If he wanted the money, why not just charge Walter more up front?

        Like, asking for the whole barrel? I doubt Walter would be taking the deal.

        > Why is he letting himself be talked into doing favors for more money if ultimately he’s just going to take the barell anyway? Why is he working so hard to keep Walter alive if the sooner the man dies the sooner he gets the cash?

        If Walter gets caught he doesn’t get the money, if Walter has to go to a town he’s more likely to get caught. The question I would ask is why he didn’t just kill Walter the second he stepped out of the propane tank, but not every criminal is a murderer.

        > What I take issue with is that the character says he can erase Saul from existence in a couple of days, and Saul himself believes this is doable.

        He says he needs a couple of days to arrange transportation for Saul, he doesn’t say how long he should lay low.

        • Philip J Reed says:

          Right, but what I’m saying is just that it wasn’t “a point made pretty clearly.” The fact that you’d have to do some rationalizing and gap-filling yourself — and the fact that those gaps can be filled with other questions and answers than what you came up with — demonstrates that, I think.

          Additionally, why not charge him more up front? I’m not saying every dollar, but grab a couple of million and wish Walter the best. It’s not like Walt has any other options here, and they all know that. He’s…ahem…over a barrel.

          And I’d have to watch it again, but I don’t think the “two or three days” comment, or whatever he said, was solely to do with arranging transportation. After all, that wouldn’t have much to do with Saul’s face being plastered all over town, which is what they were talking about. And he’s got his own vehicles he can use to drive him to Nebraska.

          Either way, again, the point is that this is all stuff left unsaid and unexplored. I’m disappointed by the fact that Breaking Bad sees it fit to glide over obstacles rather than explore them, because that’s a pretty substantial reversal of its MO. If you’re not disappointed by that, that’s awesome.

      • Justin says:

        Others will disagree but I do definitely agree with Phil here — one of the show’s bedrock strengths is going through steps like these. It’s skipped ahead a bit this season already — there was a montage of in-house cooks during the whole Vamanos Pest bit that I thought was good but a little out of character for the show — and now there’s the issue with the deleter. The concept of assigning someone a new identity has been brought up so much on this show, and now that it’s here it really is glossed over. It’s not something I can’t live with, of course, but it is definitely worth discussing.

  • Jeff says:

    Another fine write-up, Phil. In real time by biggest objection was this: AMC seemed to be delivering an 85-minute episode, but it was more like a 65-minute episode with 20 extra minutes of commercials thrown in.
    .
    I took the whole thing to be an intentionally “calm before the storm” episode, but your points are well taken. Still, the episode served a few purposes for me personally. I am developing a big crush on Todd, the creepy Robert Redford of Wrongdoing. What a character! Also, at the risk of sounding like I’m patronizing the guy because he has CP, when RJ Mitte needs to bring a scene as Walt Jr., he can really BRING it. Yes, it smacked very much of “this is how Walt Jr. is handling it,” but it didn’t hurt that Walt Jr. hit it out of the park.
    .
    From a strictly dramatic standpoint, it was weak to give the “deleter” so much of a role in the 2nd to last episode. Like Thomas Mann in his infernal The Magic Mountain, introducing new characters to the bitter end… But then, wouldn’t it be awesome if the finale was dominated by Walt’s next-door neighbor Carol??
    .
    I find Walt’s successful sojourn back to NM highly improbable. But I want so much for it to happen that I am willing to overlook some hand-waving at this point to get him back there. I think that’s where I’m at overall with this series by now, and thus unusually forgiving.
    .
    p.s. you might want to consider hiring this Sachin guy as a writing coach. He knows his stuff!

    • Philip J Reed says:

      I agree; I was excited about the episode having some extra time to play with, but it didn’t really feel like it took enough advantage of that. With so much still up in the air it feels like “Felina” will have to be a three-hour television event…but we already know it won’t be. That being said, I agree that the last episode should be about 55 minutes of Carol doing her shopping, then she comes home, sees Walt, and drops her bags.

      EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
      VINCE GILLIGAN

  • Pete says:

    I enjoyed it a lot, but I found it a little wanting in action. I completely agree that the TV Interview was clunky…but I’m willing to let it go due to where it got us. And the use of the theme tune as score was wonderful.

    The other “short-cuts”… I have a feeling that there just wasn’t anything interesting there for the writers to mine. There’s only so many procedural scenes we can have of Skyler talking to lawmen or Marie being comforted by DEA agents. And I get the impression we didn’t jump forward a few months straight away was just so we could say goodbye to Saul. Unlikely he’ll be in Felina, so was good to see him, albeit briefly.

    Keep the faith. A couple of episodes this run have been designated to just placing characters where they need to be for hell to break loose. I don’t think Felina can be quite on the level as Ozymandias, but I still have high expectations. I wanted Walt to truly embrace the badness a few episodes back and it looks like that’s where the show is going.

    The only slight mis-step? His hatred of the Nazis is just a little unfocused. He handed Jesse over to them, after all. I get the impression that he’s going to (inadvertently) spring him from his cage next week.

    Ps. Ricin for Sachin, please.

    • Philip J Reed says:

      “I get the impression we didn’t jump forward a few months straight away was just so we could say goodbye to Saul.” Obviously I have no way of knowing for sure, and yet I’m convinced you’re correct. Good call.

      “The only slight mis-step? His hatred of the Nazis is just a little unfocused. He handed Jesse over to them, after all.” It is a little strange, now that you mention it. Last episode Walt went from hatred (upon seeing Hank die) to civil (at least enough to turn Jesse over) and now we’re back to hatred. I’m not saying those are unbelievable jumps, but I can see why you’d take that as being a bit unfocused. Maybe if he had turned Jesse over to them first, and then Hank was killed…we’d at least have a consistent hatred.

  • Justin says:

    The Charlie Rose bit was arguably clunky, and I’d say without debate much too long, but I couldn’t help but see its purpose: it gets Walt back into the game. Much like Everyman, the story is stripping everything away from Walt in this half-season. His primary motivation throughout the show, at least the one he admits to, is his family, but in his conversation with Walt Jr., that is finally stripped away. He has, in a very literal way, more money than he can spend. So what’s to stop him from staying in New Hampshire or, frankly, just dying, as Walt Jr. insists? Pride.

    The only thing the show hasn’t taken from him is his integrity as a man of science. For everything he’s been through in these episodes, everyone has had to yield to him his ability as a chemist, as a genius. Hank’s last words are to tell Walt, whose hatred of Walt by that time was obsessive, that he was the smartest man he ever knew. Every enemy was someone who wanted use of his expertise, every obstacle (Skyler, but especially Pinkman) someone who felt obliged to admit that Walt was in control, that he knew more than they did.

    And so how to take that away from a man in the snowed-in mountains of New Hampshire, sitting at a dingy bar watching broadcasts out of Montreal? Take the people who, so far as we know as viewers, have known him the longest, and have them not just admonish him, but belittle him. From Season 1, Walt’s real motivation was to make up for the money he feels was taken from him by not sticking with Grey Matter. The money was a symbol, and his having a family to outlive him gave it meaning, but it wasn’t about dollars and cents so much as getting back to zero in his mental game. When he was a high school teacher who walked out on riches, he was broke but brilliant. Now he’s just a man dying and alone, his $10 million just a reminder that he should have $80 million. The interview is the only trick left up the show’s sleeve to kick him back into action.

    But again, that scene went too long.

    (As an aside, I think the moment Walt Jr. found out what was going on was the end of the show letting us have fun as Walt and Jesse’s vicarious meth cooks. Skyler hated everything about it, but she was always coming around, and this season Hank and Marie chased him a little too doggedly. Walt Jr.’s cries of “How could you do this?” are the first time I think the show unambiguously presents Walt’s actions as having consequences.)

  • Jacob C says:

    Wonderful review as always, man. But this is a rare instance where I disagree with you, you filthy mindless hack troll gay fail!

    (Just trying to keep the tone of the comment section)

    Ok, but for real though. It’s funny how this penultimate episode has polarized people. I think a lot of people feel the same way you did: it was sort of a wheel-spinner. Jesse escapes only to be recaptured. Walt comes up with plans only to have them shot down. Walt gives himself up (again) only to be overcome with pride and get back in the game (again). But I think what made this episode so darn brilliant was how, although feeling almost like a completely different show (as you noted) it managed to not only emphasize what has made the show great, but did some interesting roll-reversal as well.

    So much of the satisfaction of watching this show is watching Walt’s intricately-constructed plans be torn to shreds in devestating fashion. In Granite State, we see this happen with THE plan. The ultimate plan: it has all been for nothing. He keeps scheming. But by the end of the episode all he has is a puny Ensure box which can store exactly 1% of the cash barrel (and he used to have, what, like 8 barrels?). And his son won’t take it. His son wants him dead. The plan is over. His Heisenberg hat can no longer summon Heisenbergian qualities. It’s just a dumb hat now.

    But the role reversal thing! That was the cool part. For so long, Walt was trapped in that lab, cooking for Gus. We saw his elaborate schemes to turn the tables be constantly thwarted, and he would always end up more trapped than he already was. Now we have Jesse, trapped cooking for a lunatic (once seemingly unassuming and kind, later revealed to be a ruthless creep: Todd is the new Gus). We see his glorious escape, only to be out in a worse situation. That’s what Breaking Bad is all about. Except now, neither of our mains have anything left to fight for but themselves.

    Every individual scene felt incredible to me, but the reintroduction of the Gray Matter subplot felt perfect. It’s been one of the most interesting aspects of Walter, for me at least, the fact that he was screwed out of (or FEELS he was screwed out of) a shot to make a real difference in a field he cares about. I think a lot of how much you enjoyed the episode depends on how much you wanted to see that subplot revisited.

    • Philip J Reed says:

      “THE plan. The ultimate plan: it has all been for nothing.” Well said. Peeeeeeersonally I think I got that clearly enough by the end of Ozymandias, but I think that’s a matter of preference. I didn’t need the rapid series of plot-bumps to remind me of where everyone was…most of this could have been inferred by the end of last week, and they either needed more room to breathe (Junior and Marie particularly) or needed to say something more interesting, or in more interesting ways.

      For what it’s worth, I’m fine with Grey Matter working its way back into the plot…I just wish it wasn’t done with the grace of a head-on collision. (Flipping through the channels while they just happen to be talking about the guy who just happens to be sitting at the bar? You’re better than this, Breaking Bad.) And I wish it wasn’t so on-the-nose. I guess to me it feels like it happened because they wanted it to happen, rather than because the story naturally brought us to that point. (Hank on the toilet, by contrast, felt to me like the story naturally brought us to that point, even though it’s only slightly less circumstatial.)

      You may have a point there though. I don’t mind Grey Matter coming back, per se, but I do think we’ve had enough hints so far to know how it affected Walter, get a sturdy enough sense of how he fucked it all up, and the resentment he currently feels toward them. I don’t think bringing it back was necessary, but I’m not opposed to it. I am opposed to them bringing it back just so Gretchen can read out the Heisenberg entry from breakingbad.wikia.

  • Nr says:

    I goggled the episode along with disappointing to see if I could find a review that matched some of my frustrations with the episode. This is my favorite show ever but it is nice to see a reviewer who doesn’t believe that Vince Gilligan shits gold.

    I loved some parts and didn’t like others. I agree that the show could have axed the first month of walt’s stay, and that was my main complaint. Let us say goodbye to saul and then skip ahead. Logistics aside from the extracting of Saul and Walt and Ed’s unexplained aid to Walt, those parts were unnecessary and did not add to the plot. Walt is very sick. Knew that. Walt’s power is no more — got that from the well done scene with Saul. The NH scenes largely just rehashed old symbolism and beat home that Walt has lost the power he craves.They easily could have picked back up with him walking down to the store. All of the non-Walt happenings this episode were far more interesting to me and as you noted, there was a lot of fallout from last episode that was rushed or ignored

    That’s just my view and if you disagree, I don’t really care.

    My concern has always been that they will have too much going on in the last episode That was alleviated by the necessary housecleaning of last week’s awesome episode. But that concern is back after Granite State. I’m 90 percent sure Gilligan will not disappoint, though.

    Just needed to vent

    Sorry for typos, in advance. Typing on phone.

  • Koronin says:

    The vaccum visited lambert because there was a barrel of money that would be his when it was over

  • John says:

    I think the deleter is a business man and that Walt has an endless supply of $100 bills. It is about the money. Walt can make him a rich man in a couple of months and his cancer puts him in an agonizingly desperate position. I think it is implied that Walt is more than just a client, he is more like THE client for this guy right now.



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